Why Some Teams Seem Smarter than Others

We all have the endless meeting at work that is full re-runs, projects that actually take you a step backward and the teams that come up with wishful thinking rather the honest analogies.

But does teamwork have to be a lost cause? Psychologists have been working on the problem for a long time. And for good reason: Nowadays, though we may still idolize the charismatic leader or creative genius, almost every decision of consequence is made by a group. When Facebook’s board of directors establishes a privacy policy, when the C.I.A.’s operatives strike a suspected terrorist hide-out or when a jury decides whether to convict a defendant, what matters is not just the intelligence and wisdom of the individual actors involved. Groups of smart people can make horrible decisions — or great ones.

Psychologists have known for a century that individuals vary in their cognitive ability. But are some groups, like some people, reliably smarter than others?

Working with several colleagues and students, we set out to answer that question. In our first two studies, which we published with Alex Pentland and Nada Hashmi of M.I.T. in 2010 in the journal Science, we grouped 697 volunteer participants into teams of two to five members. Each team worked together to complete a series of short tasks, which were selected to represent the varied kinds of problems that groups are called upon to solve in the real world. One task involved logical analysis, another brainstorming; others emphasized coordination, planning and moral reasoning.

For full article visit mobile.nytime.com

More from Jules Lewis Gibson

How We Can Help Young Girls Hold Confidence

Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Digg Del StumbleUpon Tumblr VKontakte Print Email...
Read More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *